Why you need to sit down for a rocking camp bed

RTE 1 The time has come for rocking camp chairs to become a reality for Irish people, after the Minister for Health said it was time to get some exercise.

The Minister for Public Health, Pádraig Ó Cuilleach, said in a statement on Tuesday that there were around 2.5 million people in Ireland who were overweight or obese, and that many of them needed more help.

This included people in rural areas, where obesity rates are particularly high.

“We need to get our population in the best shape possible and we must also help them get fit.

It is important to have a physical activity programme which promotes physical activity and the health benefits of a healthy diet and exercise,” he said.

We must also ensure that all children and young people are given a good start in life.” “

This includes improving the physical fitness of rural people.

We must also ensure that all children and young people are given a good start in life.”

The Minister said that he was concerned that the number of people with obesity in Ireland was growing and the obesity rate was rising.

“There is an urgent need to find solutions to this problem.” “

This means that children and older adults with obesity should be encouraged to get physical activity as early as possible, and older people should be provided with the opportunity to do so. “

There is an urgent need to find solutions to this problem.”

This means that children and older adults with obesity should be encouraged to get physical activity as early as possible, and older people should be provided with the opportunity to do so.

“Our rural population is at risk of increasing their risk of developing obesity,” he added.

The Irish government has introduced a range of measures to tackle obesity.

These include the introduction of a tax on sugary drinks and alcohol in 2017, as well as new rules to prevent the sale of junk food.

However, it has also been announced that a ban on the sale and marketing of junk foods will be imposed in 2019, as part of the “Healthy Food Plan”.

These measures have been welcomed by the Department of Health and Mayo Regional Hospitals, which said that it was a step forward for a nation facing an obesity crisis.

“These new measures, which are being implemented to help reduce the obesity crisis, are important, as it will help us reduce the burden of this chronic disease on our society, the communities in which we live and work, and those around us,” said Dr Helen McColl, Regional Director of Mayo Regional Hospital.

“By targeting these foods and the unhealthy lifestyles they contain, we will make sure that our communities are not just a ticking time bomb of the sorts that we have seen in the past, but also a source of health and social wellbeing.”

However, the Department for Health has been criticised for not doing enough to combat the problem.

In its annual report, published in June, the DWP found that the average Irish household had a BMI of 29.9, a level of obesity that was “not significantly different” from the national average.

The report also found that over half of Irish people aged 18 to 64 were overweight, and the average person aged 65 or over had a body mass index (BMI) of 30.5.

This is a level not seen in many European countries.

In Ireland, the average BMI for men is 30.1, and for women is 27.8.

“Health is a key part of being a good person.

We need to do more to promote healthy living,” Dr McColl said.

She also pointed out that many people in the rural area do not have access to exercise equipment.

“The problem is not only about getting the right type of exercise equipment, but getting the equipment and training people to use it,” she added.

“That’s why we have an obesity epidemic.

We will need all of these things.” “

What is needed now is more health programmes, more health promotion and more support for those who have obesity.

We will need all of these things.”

The health minister added that he wanted to ensure that every person had the opportunity of exercising regularly and getting fit, as the obesity epidemic was a health issue.

“I am committed to tackling this problem and that’s why I have announced new measures to help tackle obesity in our population,” he told RTÉ News.

“But the Government will also work with people to help them to get fit and have healthy lifestyles.”

Dr McCll said that the Department will also be supporting organisations like the Irish Red Cross and the Gardaí with the work of their local teams in the countryside.

“When you’re a GP you have a lot of time on your hands, and if you’re working in rural settings, you may not have that time.

So I’m very keen to see that our local agencies and groups are supported,” she said.

A range of different organisations are also working together to combat obesity.

“Gardaí are on a national and local basis and are very involved in addressing this issue.